BIG SKY DOG TRAINING

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How to Walk The Excited Dog – Five Things to Dog Before You Head Out the Door

Re-print from Whole Dog Journal, 10/26/2019


You contemplate taking your dog for a walk with mixed emotions. You love the idea of going for a stroll through the neighborhood together, but it’s a major hassle to get out the door. When you pick up his leash he becomes the Tasmanian Devil – body slamming you, racing around the foyer, and bouncing off the glass door with such intensity you’re afraid he’ll crash right through it. Here are five suggestions for creating the enjoyable outing you dream of.


(1) Exercise first. Spend 15-20 minutes tossing a ball for your dog in the backyard, or providing intense mental exercise with a heavy duty shaping session. You’ll take the edge off his excitement, reduce his energy level, and make leashing-up and walking more relaxed and enjoyable for both of you.

(2) Teach him to “Say please.” Reinforce your dog’s “sit” behavior so thoroughly that “sit” becomes his default behavior – the behavior he chooses to offer when he doesn’t know what else to do. Then wait for him to sit (say “please”) to make all good things happen: sit for his dinner bowl; sit to be petted; sit for you to throw his ball; sit to have his leash put on; and sit to make the door open.

(3) Pick up his leash throughout the day. He gets amped up when you touch his leash because it always means the two of you are going for a walk. Of course he gets excited! If you pick up his leash numerous times throughout the day, sometimes
draping it over your neck and wearing it for a while, sometimes carrying it from room to room, sometimes picking it up and putting it back down, sometimes clipping it on his collar and then unclipping it, the leash will no longer be a reliable predictor of walks, and he won’t have any reason to get all excited about it. Note: This will take a while. Hope springs eternal in the canine heart.

(4) Use negative punishment. No, we don’t mean a bonk on the head. It means setting up the situation so that doing the behavior you don’t want causes a good thing to go away. Here’s how it would work in this case: If, when you pick up the leash, he goes bonkers (the behavior you don’t want), say “Oops!” in a cheerful tone of voice (what’s known as a “no reward marker,” it simply tells him no reward is forthcoming), set the leash down, and walk away. When he settles down, pick the leash up again. If he sits (say please!), proceed with attaching the leash and going for a walk. If he winds up again, do another “Oops!” and set the leash down. You’re teaching him that getting excited makes the opportunity for a walk go away; staying calm makes walks happen.

(5) Reduce the significance of other “walk cues.” Other things you do as part of your walk preparation routine can also feed his energy – getting out treats, putting on your jacket, grabbing your cell phone and keys . . . The more you randomize your ritual, the less these steps contribute to his growing excitement over the pending event, and the calmer he’ll stay as you leash him and walk out the door. For example, put your keys and cell phone in your jacket pocket before you eat breakfast. Happy walking!

For more tips on turning your dog into a more pleasant walking companion, check out Whole Dog Journal’s Walking Your Dog ebook.


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Do’s And Don’ts For Effective Training – AKC

You can teach your dog to do many different things, but there are a few general guidelines that will help make sure your training goes well. The American Kennel Club’s (AKC®) Canine Good Citizen® Director Mary Burch offers the top tips for effectively training your four-legged friend.

Do reward behaviors you like. Observe carefully when training your dog and reward the behaviors that you’d like him to continue. Treats, toys, and your attention are great rewards and can eventually be phased out and replaced with praise.

Do manage the environment. When training your dog, managing his environment will help him succeed and not do something that you don’t like. If you keep your shoes in the closet, your dog can’t make a snack out of them.

Don’t reinforce behaviors you don’t like. Reinforcing behaviors you don’t like is very common, and you might not even realize you’re doing it. Petting and playing with a puppy that jumps on you when you enter the room will more likely than not ensure that he’ll continue jumping on people because you’re giving him the attention he wants. Instead, wait until he’s not jumping on you to pet him.

Don’t forget about exercise. Exercise plays a critical role in preventing many behavior problems. Exercise also helps to relax your dog so he can pay more attention to you during training.


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Start Your Dog Training Group Class When You Want

Big Sky Dog Training, based out of the North Shore of Chicago, and Follow Your Nose Pet Boutique in Evanston, IL are offering open enrollment for all of their dog training classes. Beginning March 1, 2014 no more start dates are listed for the multiple 6 week dog training group classes. Group classes offered are Puppy, Basic, Intermediate and Fun Agility/Balance group classes.

Training and Certification tests offered by Big Sky Dog Training are AKC S.T.A.R., Canine Good Citizen and CGC/Advanced. Other training and certifications include the C.L.A.S.S. programs B.A., M.A., and PhD designed by APDT; Association for Professional Dog Trainers.

For information about any of the classes or certifications, please contact Montana C. Hayes, Owner of Big Sky Dog Training at 847-997-4707 or visit www.bigskydogtraining.net.